Career Match: Connecting Who You Are with What You'll Love to Do

By Shoya Zichy; Ann Bidou | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 10
Reds Overall

Reds represent approximately 27 percent of the overall world population. If you are not a Red, but would like to learn how to identify and communicate with one, go to Figure 10–1 on page 75.

Reds are the most adventurous and exciting Color group. Perhaps the best-known Red in the United States is Donald Trump, a highly skilled, selfpromoting, and flamboyant real estate dealmaker. Frequently referred to merely as “the Donald,” he stars in his own reality television show, The Ap- prentice, which first appeared in 2004. (Mr. Trump has not taken the Color Q test, but his Color has been determined by the Myers-Briggs community.)

“Deals are my art form,” Trump said in his 1988 best-seller Trump/The Art of the Deal. “Other people paint beautiful pictures on canvas or write wonderful poetry. I like making deals, preferably big deals; that’s how I get my kicks.”4 Kicks are a prime motivator for Reds, who will scan the universe 24 hours a day to find the next exciting thing. “Money was never a big motivation for me except as a way to keep score,” Trump added in his book. “The real excitement is playing the game.”5

So it is also for Christie Todd Whitman, Management Consultant and former Governor of New Jersey. Born into a very politically active family, it was probably inevitable that Christie Todd Whitman would achieve politi-

4Donald Trump and Tony Schwartz, Trump/The Art of the Deal (New York: Random House, 1987), p. 1.

5Ibid., p. 40.

-74-

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