Career Match: Connecting Who You Are with What You'll Love to Do

By Shoya Zichy; Ann Bidou | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 15
Blues Overall

BLUES REPRESENT 10 PERCENT of the overall world population. If you are not a Blue, but want to read about how to identify or improve communications with one, go to Figure 15–1.


Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton, D-New York

Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton of New York is one of the most interesting women in the United States, and one of the best-known Blues (who are the rarest of the four Color types).

Growing up in Park Ridge, Illinois, Hillary was seen even as a child to be assertive, purposeful, and determined, all in-born Blue characteristics. A tireless worker and consistent overachiever, she was a National Merit Scholar in high school. Her teachers noted her exceptional ability to take in information, argue a point thoroughly, but change her mind when new input demanded it (core Blue abilities).

In her senior year, she was voted most likely to succeed. She went on to become a high achiever in both college (Wellesley student body president) and at Yale law school.

Her Blue abilities served her well early in her career. Assigned as part of the impeachment inquiry staff investigating Richard Nixon, she worked dawn to midnight seven days a week. Hillary is remembered as “determined and dutiful, grinding away in a mildewed office overlooking an alleyway.”8 This typifies the Blue ability to work relentlessly on a problem of interest, functioning without significant stress in solemn and tense environments.

8Evan Thomas, “Bill and Hillary’s Long, Hot Summer,” Newsweek (October, 19, 1998), p. 38

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