Career Match: Connecting Who You Are with What You'll Love to Do

By Shoya Zichy; Ann Bidou | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 18
Blue/Red Extroverts

YOU’RE NOT ONLY A BLUE, you also have strong secondary characteristics of the adventurous Red personality. And you have tested as a Color Q Extrovert, which means you recharge your batteries by being with people, rather than being alone. Your Color group prides itself on finding innovative ways to do things. You take initiative and surmount all limitations with a “can do” attitude. Please note the underlying components of the following profile have been researched for nearly six decades worldwide and verified across age, sex, ethnic, and socioeconomic boundaries. So if we don’t get you right, nobody will!


You Overall

Blue/Red Extroverts radiate a contagious enthusiasm for anything that captures their interest. You constantly scan the universe for those new and unusual ideas that fire your vivid imagination. Creative, insightful, and mentally stimulating, you love the challenge and excitement of pursuing your latest goal… until it ceases to interest you. But until then, you are tireless, energizing others as you charge ahead.

Whether you’ve got advanced degrees or not, you are blessed with high intellectual energy, constantly on the alert for the latest and greatest opportunities. When you see them, you pounce. Inquisitive and clever, you need a great deal of freedom to use your many talents. A flexible environment is key. Unconventional approaches are fun for you, and you will bend

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