Career Match: Connecting Who You Are with What You'll Love to Do

By Shoya Zichy; Ann Bidou | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 19
Blue/Red Introverts

YOU’RE NOT ONLY A BLUE, you also have strong secondary characteristics of the Red personality. And you have tested as a Color Q Introvert, which means you recharge your batteries by being alone, rather than being with others. Much, but not all, of this material will focus on human and emotional subjects, which your Color finds irritating. You will be more open to this if you are in the second half of your life, but will need it more if you are younger. But since you respond to new ideas, the aim will be to surprise you with our accuracy.


You Overall

Did the paragraph above surprise you? Okay, let’s see what else we can say to rock your highly logical world. After all, you are open-minded. Mental stimulation is as necessary to you as breathing. Color Q is a new derivative of a decades-old, tried-and-true system of personality profiling. It goes back to concepts proposed by Carl Jung. There are a lot of perspectives in here for you to debate, so get a friend to read this chapter with you and go at it from all angles. You’re good at that.

Your group of friends is small, but intimate. Few see your real feelings. Emotional stuff is usually last on your list, but many of your friendships are formed over shared projects. Privacy is important, though, because when concentrating on something, you find interruptions irritating. So just view reading this as a new project on which you’ve decided to risk 20 minutes (or fewer; it’s likely you skim or read fast).

-171-

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