Instant Appeal: The 8 Primal Factors That Create Blockbuster Success

By Vicki Kunkel | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 3
Does It Look Like a Duck?
THE VISUAL PREPROGRAMMING
FACTOR

Bob Bylak is a tall, lanky man with a thin, angular face, short curly hair, and large, round eyes set beneath thick, heavy eyebrows. He’s worked at the same company; lived in the same small, close-knit Colorado town; and has had the same friends and business colleagues for the past eight years. Yet a couple of times each month—either while in a meeting with colleagues, or at a business networking event, or buying something from the local hardware store or the car dealer— someone will mistakenly call him by another name.

“It’s not uncommon for me to be walking down the street and have one of my neighbors wave to me and say, ‘Hey, Tom, er, I mean, uh… uh…’ At this point they’re stammering and I can tell they’re desperately trying to remember my name. Then, it finally comes to them: ‘Bob! How’s it going, Bob?’ It just seems to happen all the time,” Bob laments. And he finds that even people who are trained to remember names for a living—people like car dealers, insurance sales reps, and real estate agents—call him Tom instead of Bob.

“When I bought my first house, I’d be riding around in the car with this real estate guy, and he’d keep saying, ‘You know, Tom, you’ll probably have to adjust your expectations a little based on what you’re willing to put down,’ or ‘What did you think of that last place, Tom?’ I’d keep correcting him, but he still kept calling me Tom! He’d apologize profusely, but then the next time we’d meet to go looking at

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