Instant Appeal: The 8 Primal Factors That Create Blockbuster Success

By Vicki Kunkel | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 8
What Our Minds Really See
THE MENTAL REAL
ESTATE FACTOR

Reality TV shows have been all the rage for nearly a decade. We’ve had Survivor, The Apprentice, Dancing with the Stars, American Idol, and America’s Next Top Model, just to name a few. There seems to be no end in sight for the popularity of these shows where seemingly anybody (with or without talent) can become a “somebody,” at least for his or her fifteen minutes of fame. While the underdog concept— the idea of the average person being able to go from obscurity to fame and fortune—is part of the appeal of these shows, there’s a bigger pull to their popularity, and it’s something scientists consider a type of unconscious mind-reading device deep in the brain stem. I call it the mental real estate factor.

Mental real estate involves creating specific visuals that will trigger specific primal responses. The mind doesn’t see just the objects or the action in front of it. For example, when you watch a football game, your mind doesn’t just see a bunch of players on the field. It sees and, more important, makes you feel as if you are on the field playing right along with the football players.

Once you understand how this device works, you’ll have a powerful tool that can help you gain popularity for your products, your cause, and even your executives. You’ll understand why Dancing with the Stars is so popular. You’ll know how to get the public on board with your charitable cause or environmental crusade. You’ll know

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