The Accidental Entrepreneur: 50 Things I Wish Someone Had Told Me about Starting a Business

By Susan Urquhart-Brown | Go to book overview

CHAPTER3
TAKING CARE
OF BUSINESS

A Name That Grows with
Your Business
“WHAT’S IN A NAME?” A great deal when it comes to the word or phrase that characterizes and brands your business. Naming your business is both exciting and difficult. The name you choose for your business creates the image of your company. Always think about how your business will be perceived by others—customers, vendors, competitors, and the rest of the business community. You want to be taken seriously in the marketplace. How do you name your business? If you have developed your own business, the choice is yours. You want to choose a name that reflects both the essence of your business and you. If you have purchased a franchise, the decision has already been made for you. And if you have bought an existing business, you may decide to change its name. However, research this carefully so that you don’t lose market share because of a name change.

10 “Always think about how your
business will be perceived by
others—customers, vendors,
competitors, and the rest of
the business community.”

No matter what type of business you’re naming, consider these four points:
1. Make sure the name fits your business. You want customers to clearly understand what product or service you offer. For example, “JRG Associates” might indicate that the business involves consultants, but does not reveal what type of consulting the company offers. “Don

-33-

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The Accidental Entrepreneur: 50 Things I Wish Someone Had Told Me about Starting a Business
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword by Jim Horan ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - What Is An Entrepreneur, Anyway? 5
  • Chapter 2 - Ready, Set, Go! 13
  • Chapter 3 - Taking Care of Business 33
  • Chapter 4 - What Do You Bring to the Party? 65
  • Chapter 5 - Market and Sell Your Socks Off! 91
  • Chapter 6 - Get Connected to the Web for Profit 133
  • Chapter 7 - Making Room for More Business 155
  • Index 173
  • About the Author 179
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