The Career Clinic: Eight Simple Rules for Finding Work You Love

By Maureen Anderson | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I always feel guilty when I sit down to write. “Shouldn’t you be working?” that little voice in my head says. I have to remind myself writing is work. It’s my work, and I love it so much I’m embarrassed to get paid for it. The thing about writing—or radio, for that matter—is that you’re not generally paid so much you can’t live with yourself.

The reward is in the work. And in my case, the chance to compare notes with some fascinating, fun people. Thanks to each of you, for keeping me inspired. That your stories overlapped mine, here, is a thrill.

Thanks to Dick Bolles, who taught me everything I’m still learning. To Todd Orjala, who made me glad I changed careers—and helped me find Wendy Lazear. Wendy, you packed so much encouragement into one paragraph that wanting anything else out of life seems greedy.

-207-

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The Career Clinic: Eight Simple Rules for Finding Work You Love
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • The Career Clinic xiii
  • One - No Regrets 1
  • Two - Talk to Yourself 23
  • Three - Stop 45
  • Four - Ask for Directions When You Get Lost 65
  • Five - Accept Free Samples 93
  • Six - Say Yes 117
  • Seven - Have Fun! 139
  • Eight - Try Something New When You Stop Having Fun 173
  • A Parting Gift 205
  • Acknowledgments 207
  • Index 209
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