Other People's Children: The Battle for Justice and Equality in New Jersey's Schools

By Deborah Yaffe | Go to book overview

NOTES

These notes are intended to supplement, not duplicate, the attribution provided in the text. Therefore, when the text identifies a legal brief, a judicial opinion, or an interview subject as the source of a quotation, I do not give a more precise reference here. Chapter notes identify the interviews, archives, and published sources on which the text is based; supply references for anecdotes or direct quotations from published or archival sources; and identify the speaker when the text quotes directly from an unnamed interview subject. The “Works Cited” section supplies full publication information for printed sources. Because the archives of the Education Law Center (“ELC archives”) and the Morheuser papers held by Thomas Cioppettini (“Cioppettini papers”) are uncataloged, it is impossible to indicate with precision where documents from those collections can be found.

I use the following abbreviations: Asbury Park Press: APP Bergen Record: Record Jersey Journal: JJ Milwaukee Sentinel: MS New Jersey Law Journal: NJLJ New York Times: NYT Philadelphia Inquirer: PI Star-Ledger: S-L Times of Trenton: TT


INTRODUCTION. THE INHERITANCE

The suburban dentist is quoted in Iver Peterson, “Jersey Education: $ + $ = Quality,” NYT, February 5, 1975. In our interview, Thomas Corcoran called education the middleclass property right. For the distinction between equity and adequacy suits, see, e.g., Rebell, “Educational Adequacy, Democracy and the Courts”; Reed, On Equal Terms; and Thro, “Judicial Analysis During the Third Wave of School Finance Litigation.” The “Litigation” page of the National Access Network’s Web site discusses the proportion of plaintiff victories in the two types of cases. The Peter Schrag statement comes from Final Test, 85.

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Other People's Children: The Battle for Justice and Equality in New Jersey's Schools
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface and Acknowledgments ix
  • The Plaintiffs and Their Families xiii
  • Introduction- The Inheritance 1
  • Part One - The Beginning Robinson V. Cahill, 1970–1976 7
  • 1 - Jersey City''s Tax War 9
  • 2 - Celebrating the Bicentennial 31
  • Part Two - The Crusade Abbott V. Burke, 1979–1998 57
  • 3 - The True Believer 59
  • 4 - Son of Robinson 86
  • 5 - The Families 110
  • 6 - "the System Is Broken" 145
  • 7 - The Twenty-One/Forty-One Rule 176
  • 8 - The Children of Abbott 214
  • 9 - A Constitutional Right to Astroturf 249
  • Part Three - The Never-Ending Story Implementing Abbott, 1998–2006 279
  • 10 - "We Do Not Run School Systems" 281
  • 11 - The Children Grow Up 304
  • Conclusion - Other People''s Children 322
  • Notes 335
  • Works Cited 351
  • Index 363
  • About the Author 371
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