Another Arabesque: Syrian-Lebanese Ethnicity in Neoliberal Brazil

By John Tofik Karam | Go to book overview

TWO
Eth(n)ics and Transparent
State Reform

REFERENCES TO THE ALLEGED shrewdness of Arabs also made headline news in a corruption scandal that mired the São Paulo city government in 1999 and 2000. As citizens from lay, business, and media circles clamored for “more transparent” governance, city councilors of Middle Eastern origin became the embodiment of corruption in mainstream media reportage. In efforts to offset their image as corrupt ethnics, city councilors of Middle Eastern descent carried out the second annual commemoration of Lebanese independence day in São Paulo’s city government. Clamoring for justice in the Middle East, these politicians expressed a righteous brand of Arab ethnicity in a Brazilian government undergoing transparent reform today.

Exploring an ethical dimension of the Arab ethnic project, this chapter focuses on politicians, media pundits, and lay people of Middle Eastern descent in a São Paulo city government corruption scandal. My aim is to grasp how Arab ethnicity has intensified through images of corruption in the Brazilian media and the discourse of ethics from the World Bank. Attending to how politicians of Middle Eastern descent have been charged with corruption in the national media, I argue that they have used the official Lebanese independence day event in city government to gain ethical recognition as Arab ethnics in the public sphere. Serving as a platform to make righteous declarations, the event has accentuated the accountability of Arab eth(n)ics in Brazil amid an anticorruption program sponsored by the World Bank.

These ethical highlights of ethnicity are best grasped in what Akhil Gupta calls the imagined state (Gupta 1995; see also Ferguson and Gupta 2003).

-46-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Another Arabesque: Syrian-Lebanese Ethnicity in Neoliberal Brazil
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 216

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.