The Beauty of Holiness: Anglicanism & Architecture in Colonial South Carolina

By Louis P. Nelson | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The foundations for this book were laid several years ago, during the many excursions to and conversations about South Carolina's rural parish churches with my then-boss and now-colleague Jonathan Poston. I began working for Jon in 1991, and his enthusiasm for and encyclopedic knowledge of South Carolina's early architecture launched the intellectual journey that has resulted in this book. Jon's commitment to the examination, preservation, and interpretation of greater Charleston's historic architecture ignited in me a deep desire to explore these buildings in great detail and to ask questions about how they worked.

After working with Jon, I went to graduate school, where this project received the support of a University of Delaware Competitive Fellowship, for which I am most grateful. While at the University of Delaware, I had the pleasure of working with a host of great scholars and mentors. I owe a great debt of thanks to my dissertation advisor, Bernie Herman. My work has benefited from Bernie's broad understanding of early America and his thoughtful criticism of historical method. Because of Bernie, I am a better writer and a more critical thinker. A number of other faculty members played a hand in shaping the way I think about buildings and historical method, including J. Richie Garrison, Damie Stillman, Perry Chapman, and Wayne Craven. While at Delaware, I also benefited from innumerable conversations with friends and colleagues, including Anna Andrzejewski, Jeroen van den Hurk, Cindy Falk, Pat Keller, Tom Ryan, Pam Sachant, Karen Sherry, Ryan Smith, and especially Jennifer Amundson and Jeff Klee.

There are a number of scholars and friends who have shaped my understanding of early American architecture. Carl Lounsbury introduced me to the rigors of fieldwork and has been a great mentor in the study of religious architecture. My work with Carl in the South, the Mid-Atlantic, and England has had a profound impact on this book. I have also spent untold hours recording buildings with Ed Chappell, Willie Graham, and Mark Wenger. From them I learned the benefits of very careful attention to the smallest of details. And I am honored to have had various portions of this book read by Cary and Barbara Carson and Catherine Bishir. All three have helped me frame and communicate my arguments. A handful of scholars also read portions of this manuscript with an eye to material religion and American

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