CHAPTER ELEVEN
SKETCH OF A THEORY OF VOLITION

IN this last chapter I shall consider three objections to the draft theory put forward. The first I shall discuss and dismiss. The second will lead us to modify both our own theory of volition and Geach's theory of judgement, while preserving the parallelism between the theories. The third will lead us to abandon the parallel, and to point out the difference between the intensionality of an object of willing and the intensionality of an object of thought.

The first objection may be put forward as follows.

Given a piece of oratio obliqua corresponding to a statement, we can always tack on "James judged that . . ." and "James believed that . . ." to it to make it a report of a judgement or a belief, no matter what the tense of the sentence done into oratio obliqua, and no matter what the opinion of the reporter concerning the truth-value of that sentence. The same is true of some affective verbs such as "hope" and "regret". But it is not in general true of affective verbs that they can occur with that-clauses of all tenses and without commitment about truth-value. "James feels remorse that cannot be followed by an oratio

-212-

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Action, Emotion and Will
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Chapter One The Passions of the Soul 1
  • Chapter Two The Experimental Examination Of the Emotions 29
  • Chapter Three Feelings 52
  • Chapter Four Motives 76
  • Chapter Five Desire 100
  • Chapter Six Pleasure 127
  • Chapter Seven Actions and Relations 151
  • Chapter Eight States, Performances, Activities 171
  • Chapter Nine Objects 187
  • Chapter Ten Judging and Willing 203
  • Chapter Eleven Sketch of a Theory of Volition 212
  • Bibliography 240
  • Index 243
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