Spirit: Chapter Six of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit

By G. W. F Hegel; Daniel E. Shannon et al. | Go to book overview

Note on the Translation

Our translation of Chapter 6, “Spirit,” is produced from Hegel’s Phänomenologie des Geistes, edited by Reinhard Heede and Wolfgang Bonspien (Hamburg: Felix Meiner, 1980). This work presents the new critical edition of Hegel’s work. It appears as volume nine in Hegel’s Gesammelte Werke, edited by the Hegel Commission of the Rheinische-Westphalische Academy of Science, in association with the Hegel Archives. The Hegel Commission is publishing the complete works of Hegel in twenty-one volumes including his lectures and notes. We have included in our translation the page numbers from this critical edition. They appear in square brackets in the text. We have not used their notes but have supplied our own.

For our translation we have retained some of Hegel’s original punctuation. You will see, for instance, some sentences beginning with a dash. This is Hegel’s way of indicating a break in the argument without his actually starting a new paragraph. We have followed his original word choice and even his spelling. In one instance this actually changes the meaning of a word. In modern editions, where Hegel writes Principe the German editors have Prinzip. Hegel looks to be referring to a prince, while the so-called corrected word would be referring to a principle.

Where there is more than one possible rendering of a term or phrase we have included alternatives in the notes. In some instances, where there is a tradition of translation that opposes our own, we have cited the other translators—English, French, and Italian—how they rendered the word or phrase, and why we have come to a different conclusion.

We have numbered all the paragraphs. Alongside the beginning of each paragraph we give first the paragraph number from the beginning of the chapter; the second number is the paragraph number from the beginning of the book. The second number corresponds to A. V. Miller’s numbering in his translation of the Phenomenology (1977), but in one instance in “Spirit” he omitted a paragraph number. We do not know if he omitted other paragraph numbers earlier in the text; so we decided that instead of

-xix-

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Spirit: Chapter Six of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction to the Translation vii
  • Note on the Translation xix
  • VI. Spirit1 1
  • A Commentary on Hegel's [Spirit] 159
  • Glossary 219
  • Select Bibliography 227
  • Index 233
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