The Limits of Influence: Pico, Louvain, and the Crisis of Renaissance Astrology

By Steven Vanden Broecke | Go to book overview

INTERMEZZO
A FEW COMMENTS ON THE USE
AND NATURE OF ASTROLOGICAL REFORM

Although the universal Flood failed to materialize, contemporaries remained alert about the effects of the February 1524 conjunctions. The Bolognese notary Andrea Pietramellara recorded that the weather in February 1524 was surprisingly fair. From March through July, however, heavy showers and storms frequently induced the local clergy to make supplications through prayer and the ringing of church bells. By the beginning of the fall, Pietramellara witnessed an increasing number of outbreaks of the plague.1 In 1556, the Louvain alumnus Joannes Stadius reminded his readers how 1524 had indeed been a particularly wet year.2 Germans linked the conjunctions with the rise of Lutheranism.3 In 1583, Sixtus ab Hemminga mentioned how the conjunctions were often said to have caused the German Peasants’ War and the captivity of François 1 at Pavia (1525).4

If anything, this suggests that the courtly calls for astrological reform were highly problematic. Many contemporaries must have felt that the dire prospects of the 1524 conjunctions had been confirmed to an important extent. Presumably, this was even more the case before February 1524. Hence, we must carefully question why court practitioners like Pigghe and Scepper felt the need to advocate astrological reform.


1. Business as usual: Albert Pigghe vs. Gaspar Laet

In his reply to Pigghe’s attack, Gaspar Laet leaked insider information about the Louvain origins of Pigghe’s astronomical corrections.

1 Thorndike, History, vol. 5, pp. 231–232.

2 Stadius, Ephemerides (1556), fol. A3v: “Sic Planetarum in humidis signis congres-
sus humiditates anno 1524.”

3 Thorndike, History, vol. 5, p. 233.

4Ibid., vol. 5, pp. 310 and 396; Ibid., vol. 6, p. 116.

-137-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Limits of Influence: Pico, Louvain, and the Crisis of Renaissance Astrology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 320

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.