Buffalo Soldier Regiment: History of the Twenty-Fifth United States Infantry, 1869-1926

By John H. Nankivell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XVI
THE O’DONNELL AFFAIR—DEATH OF LIEUTENANT SCHENCK—O’NEIL’S
FIGHT AT IBA—SURRENDER OF COLONEL ARCE—HEROISM OF SER-
GEANT GREEN—AMUSING ANECDOTES—COLONEL BURT’S PROMO-
TION AND FAREWELL TO THE REGIMENT—COLONEL A. H. BOWMAN
IS ASSIGNED TO THE REGIMENT—THE RETURN TO THE UNITED
STATES.

The following official reports, newspaper clippings, and personal narratives, selected at random, contain much valuable data respecting the service of the regiment in the Philippines and are reproduced here because of their absorbing interest:


GALLANT WORK BY THE FORT LOGAN MEN

Town of O’Donnell in Luzon with 125 prisoners and large amount of ammunition and guns taken by soldiers of 25th.—(Correspondence of the Associated Press)

Bamban, Luzon, November 26, 189!)—In the advance from Angeles to Dagupan by our soldiers during the last two weeks the taking of the town of O’Donnell, by Colonel Burt’s 25th United States regular infantry, is worthy of more than passing mention. O’Donnell lies about six miles northeast of Bamban and off the railroad from Manila to Dagupan. Our main advance missed O’Donnel on its way north. The 25th was stationed at Bamban having arrived there after a hard march from down the track. They had missed the fighting and excitement. On November 17th a Filipino officer came to the outposts of the 25th, and throwing his captain’s shoulder straps on the ground said expressively, “I don’t want anymore.’ He was taken to Colonel Burt, well treated and well fed. It soon was learned that this man had several followers out in the bush, also anxious to surrender and only awaiting news of their leader’s reception at our hands before venturing in themselves. “Go and fetch them,” said Colonel Burt. “We’ll give each man $15 who turns in a rifle.” These men came and their eyes stuck out with wonder at their good fortune when the Colonel counted out thirty Mexican dollars for each good rifle surrendered. “Over here about six miles is O’Donnel filled with soldiers and arms,” said the Filipino captain, “and if you want to send men to surprise and capture the town, I’ll lead them.”

This was just what the 25th wanted to do. Preparations were made at once and on on the evening of the 18th, at 7 o’clock, Companies B, K and E, under command of Captain Leonhaeuser started for O’Donnell under the guidance of the Filipino captain. In order to surprise the garrison the American’s route was roundabout and over the foot hills of the mountains. At 4 o’clock in the morning the command sighted a Filipino outpost on top of a hill. It was deserted. The column started again. The next Filipino outpost was a palm leaf shack at the edge of the road. Lieutenant Bates surrounded the house with a detail of Company K. Inside men could be seen moving. “We have the town surrounded,” said Lieutenant Bates in Spanish, speaking into a back window two feet above his head. “If you surrender quickly we won t hurt you. If you give an alarm we’ll kill you.” This was too tempting a proposition even to consider. Out of the dark windows the insurgents passed three rifles and three bags of cartridges and even a bowl of rice. Then three abject and frightened Tagalos came out to the Americans with humble protestations of friendship. At this moment the yellow, barking, howling curs that infest every village on the island gave the alarm. There was an immediate move toward the town, and a few scattered shots were fired as our troops entered. We were in the town now and the colored soldiers showed a grim and great earnestness in their work of gathering in prisoners, rifles and bolos. Strong black arms caught fleeing insurgents upon the streets and hauled them from under beds and beneath houses. Native women screamed in alarm and on their knees offered money and food to the American troops. At 6 o’clock in the morning the command started to return bringing with it prisoners, some 225 rifles and nearly

-104-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Buffalo Soldier Regiment: History of the Twenty-Fifth United States Infantry, 1869-1926
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 248

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.