Buffalo Soldier Regiment: History of the Twenty-Fifth United States Infantry, 1869-1926

By John H. Nankivell | Go to book overview

APPENDIX I

MILITARY HISTORY OF BRIGADIER GENERAL GEORGE LIPPIT ANDREWS

General Andrews was assigned as Lieutenant Colonel of the 25th Infantry, December 1, 1870, and promoted to the Colonelcy of the regiment January 1, 1871; on April 22, 1892, he was retired for age and thus terminated his long service of over twenty-one years as colonel of the regiment. During these years with the usual exception of detached duty and leaves of absence he was personally in command, and due to his effective, even administration the regiment was long distinguished for its efficiency and discipline.

He first joined at Fort Clark, Texas; subsequently the headquarters were stationed at Fort Davis, Texas; Fort Randall, S. D.; Fort Snelling, Minnesota; and finally, at Fort Missoula, Montana, where he relinquished command on his retirement from active service.

General Andrews’ army service began as Lieutenant Colonel 1st Missouri Volunteer Infantry, April 24, 1861; with this regiment he was engaged in the capture of the Confederate Camp Jackson, near St. Louis; in the actions at Booneville, of which he became military governor; Dug Spring; McCullough’s Store, and Wilson’s” Creek, Missouri, where he commanded the Second Brigade of General Nathaniel Lyon’s column; was wounded and had his horse shot under him.

Appointed Major, 17th U. S. Infantry, May 14, 1861, he relinquished his volunteer commission and joined that regiment which was being recruited and organized at Fort Preble, Maine, in October, 1861. In March, 1862, he conducted the first battalion of this regiment to the Army of the Potomac and commanded it in the 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 5th Army Corps, participating in the battles of Yorktown, Gaines Mills, (commanding battalions of the 10th and 17th regulars), Seven Days, Malvern Hill, Harrison’s Landing, Second Bull Run, (brevetted Lieutenant Colonel, August 30, 1862), Antietam, reconnaissance across the Potomac River below Sharpsburg and to Leetown; Snicker’s Gap, Fredericksburg (commanding 2nd regular infantry brigade), and Chancellorsville (brevetted colonel, May 3, 1863).

Promoted Lieutenant Colonel 13th U. S. Infantry, October 14, 1864, he served in command at Camp Dennison, Ohio, where he mustered out 15,000 volunteers and at Newport Barracks, Kentucky, and Jefferson Barracks, Missouri. Superintendent of regimental recruiting service, 1865-’66. In June, 1866, he went with the regiment up the Missouri River by boat to posts in the Indian country, taking station at old Fort Sully, S. D. This he soon abandoned, and proceeding about twenty-five miles further up the river, located and partially built a new fort of the same name. He subsequently was in command of Camp Cook and Fort Shaw, Montana.

Having been unassigned when the army was reorganized in 1869, he served under the Interior Department as Superintendent of Indian Affairs for Arizona Territory, at Yuma, until he joined the 25th Infantry in 1871. On April 23, 1904, he was appointed Brigadier General on the retired list for service in the Civil War, under the provisions of an Act of Congress of that year.

A descendant in both paternal and maternal lines of early New England families, he was born in Providence, R. I., April 22, 1828. Resided in Washington, D. C., after retirement, and died there July 19, 1920, in his ninety-third year.

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