Buffalo Soldier Regiment: History of the Twenty-Fifth United States Infantry, 1869-1926

By John H. Nankivell | Go to book overview

APPENDIX P

MILITARY HISTORY OF COLONEL ANDREW SHERIDAN BURT,
TWENTY-FIFTH U. S. INFANTRY

“Colonel Andrew Sheridan Burt, 25th Infantry, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, November 21, 1839. In April 1861, he volunteered in the 6th Ohio Infantry, and was subsequently made a Sergeant. The same year he accepted a 1st Lieutenancy in the 18th United States Infantry, with which command he went into the field in 1861. The command was attached to the 3rd Brigade, 1st Division of the Army of the Ohio, Colonel Robert L. McCook and Brigadier General George H. Thomas, commanding, respectively. Lieutenant Burt was detailed as Aide-de-Camp on the staff of General Halleck and assigned to serve with Colonel McCook. The same year he was made Assistant Adjutant General of the Brigade, and continued as such until Colonel McCook’s death.

“In January, 1863, he reported to General Rosecrans, commanding the Army of the Cumberland, and by him was assigned to the Inspector-General’s department of his staff, serving so through Hoover’s Gap and Tullahoma campaigns, advance beyond Chattanooga, and in the battle of Chickamauga. He was commended in reports by the Commanding General for services in the campaign and battle of Chickamauga. Captain Burt was especially mentioned for gallant service in that battle by Major General Alexander McCook, commanding a corps.

“In the fall of 1863, at his own request, he relinquished his staff appointment and took command of his Company F, 1st Battalion, 18th Infantry. He commanded that company in the charge on Missionary Ridge. General Palmer, commanding, immediately after the victorious assault, thanked the Company for its gallant service on that occasion.

“Captain Burt commanded his Company F, 18th Infantry, part of the Regular Brigade of the 14th Army Corps, in the Atlanta campaign, and was in the actions participated in by his Regiment from Buzzard’s Roost to Jonesboro, and received the personal thanks of the Detachment Commander for gallant service in the last battle. He was mentioned in reports for services in the Atlanta campaign by the Detachment Commander as well as by General Thomas. He was brevetted Major, 1864, for gallant services in the Atlanta campaign and at the battle of Jonesboro. Major Burt marched, in 1866, with his company from Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, to Fort Bridger, Wyoming Territory.

“In the fall of 1877, while in command of a detachment of recruits enroute to Fort McKinley, he was attacked by Indians under Red Cloud, at Crazy Woman’s Fork, and the Indians were beaten off.

“While in command of Fort C. F. Smith, Montana, in 1868, he had two successful skirmishes with hostile Indians. From 1865 until 1878, Major Burt in command of his company, was nearly every year changing stations or on expeditions with all the difficulties of marching on the frontier in the hostile Indian days.

“He was in Stanley’s Yellowstone expedition in 1873; with Colonel Dodge’s command as escort to the Jenny expedition to the Black Hills in 1875; General Crook s expedition, 1876, and commanded a battalion of two companies in the attack by Indians on the com’ mand camped on Powder River.

“At the battle of the Rosebud, General Crook, having ordered the withdrawal of Colonel Royal’s battalion of cavalry from a certain position on the field, the retreat became a rout under the Indians’ hand-to-hand assault. Major Burt with his company, and that of Major Burrows, was detailed “to stop those Indians,” which the two companies did, and the hard-pressed cavalry battalion was rescued from a precarious position.

“At ‘Slim Buttes’ same campaign, Major Burt commanded a battalion in the repulse of an Indian attack.

-203-

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