Successful Aging through the Life Span: Intergenerational Issues in Health

By May L. Wykle; Peter J. Whitehouse et al. | Go to book overview

Introduction

The Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing and the University Center on Aging and Health at Case Western Reserve University sponsored the 14th Florence Cellar Gerontology Conference on October 7, 2002, in Cleveland, Ohio. The conference aimed to bring scholars and practitioners from the community together to examine ideas of successful aging and productive intergenerational relationships. To reach a wider audience and disseminate the thinking and research that is being done for successful aging and intergenerational health, the issues and ideas that were discussed at the conference are presented in this book. A greater awareness of the gerontological issues will lead to more in-depth research, better outcomes, and more widespread knowledge of the problems and solutions associated with aging.

Exploring concepts and practices of successful and productive aging, identifying the best practices to enhance successful aging, examining trends in intergenerational caregiving, and defining the roles and responsibilities across the stages of life are some of the issues that were confronted at the conference. Sessions were held to discuss factors that contribute to successful aging, dealing specifically with exercise and nutrition, as well as with established stereotypes of aging. Other sessions concentrated on specific intergenerational issues, such as the role of children and adults in interaction with elders as well as the role of care services in helping elders to remain active and stay involved in the social realm.

The conference reflected the vision of Florence Cellar, a nurse who wished to improve the quality of life for older persons, and both academic and community leaders actively engaged in discussions on successful aging. The purpose of this book is to present the major foci of the conference—namely, the following:

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