Selected Poetry and Prose

By Chiara Matraini; Elaine Maclachlan | Go to book overview

VOLUME
INTRODUCTION

THE OTHER VOICE

Chiara Matraini self- consciously joined a tradition of poetic writing in Italy initiated by Petrarch, codified by Pietro Bembo, and continued by female predecessors (notably Vittoria Colonna, 1492–1547) and contemporaries (Isabella di Morra, c. 1520–45, and Laura Battiferra, 1523–89). In turn she was known by both male and female writers who followed her, though like many other women writers, she was eventually forgotten. Although her work was anthologized in 1726, it was not fully recovered until the late twentieth century. Like that of several other Italian women writers of the sixteenth century, her work has two main poles: love poetry and religious works.

Matraini was born into a middle- class family of weavers in Lucca, where she lived most of her life. Her family was doing well when her brother was prosecuted in 1531 for participating in a revolt against the city’s ruling class; he was imprisoned and died in prison four years later. Despite all this, Matraini remained attached to her family, even keeping her family name after her marriage, and in her will she bequeathed her possessions to family members. At the same time, she maintained a sense of independence throughout her life. She was never close to her only child, a son born when she was eighteen, with whom she later entered into conflict over her inheritance. And she entered into two love affairs: the first was a passionate one that ended tragically with the death of her lover and that is reflected in many of her poems; the second was more of a spiritual type.

Though never formally educated, she developed a desire to write poetry. That desire was certainly stimulated (if not initiated) by her contact with men interested in literary discourse and later in public issues, out of which came her flirtation with religious ideas sympathetic to the Protestant reform movement as well as her introduction to the Petrarchan poetic tradition.

She discovered, through her path of self- education, not only male but

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Selected Poetry and Prose
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 276

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.