101 Sample Write-Ups for Documenting Employee Performance Problems: A Guide to Progressive Discipline & Termination

By Paul Falcone | Go to book overview

2
Disciplinary Levels,
Subjects, and
Prior Notifications

The Golden Rule of Progressive Discipline is simply this: It’s not enough for a company to merely document discipline; managers have to be able to demonstrate their affirmative efforts at rehabilitating their employees. Here’s how it’s done.

To begin our venture into the world of progressive discipline, we need to look at the anatomy of the proposed format. If an infraction of company rules has occurred, performance has fallen below an expected minimum level of output, or the work flow has been impeded as a result of unauthorized absence or tardiness, it’s time to prepare a disciplinary notice. In this chapter, we’ll discuss the first four parts of the write-up template: the heading, disciplinary levels, subject, and prior notifications sections.

The Heading

PERFORMANCE CORRECTION NOTICE

Employee Name:Paul SmithDate Presented:May 10, 2010
Department:WarehouseSupervisor:Jane Doe

First, you’ll notice that the “customizable narrative” (the part that you write) is shown in italics, while the template document (which does not change from sample to sample) is printed in roman. This will make it easier for you to quickly identify which part of the form you need to fill in for each situation.

In addition, note that the date in the heading should be the date on which the document is shared with the employee, rather than the date on which the incident occurred. You will normally refer to the date of the occurrence in the Incident Description portion of the text. (For example, On April 29, 2010, you engaged in inappropriate conduct with a coworker.…) The active date of the write-up begins the day the employee is made aware of the transgres-

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