101 Sample Write-Ups for Documenting Employee Performance Problems: A Guide to Progressive Discipline & Termination

By Paul Falcone | Go to book overview

#89 Summary Discharge: Time Card Fraud

Clerical support specialist commits time card falsification and is immediately discharged for cause.

April 16, 2010

Dave Regan
666 Calle Arbor Road
Phoenix, AZ 85250

Dear Dave,

This letter is to inform you that you are hereby terminated from our company effective
at the close of business today. On April 10, 2010, you clocked out for lunch at 12:08

P.M.1 You clocked back in at 12:42. This was consistent with your 30-minute lunch
period.

However, you then left the office again and did not return until 1:20 P.M. You also
never reported to your supervisor that you were taking additional time. At 1:20, your
supervisor, Polly Daniels, witnessed you clocking in again on the Kronos system.
However, that “swipe” with your badge was not valid and did not register because you
ran your card backward through the machine. (There is no entry on the Kronos report
for 1:20 P.M.) In addition, your supervisor verified that you were not working at your
desk between 12:42 and 1:20.

Consequently, you have violated “Timekeeping” policy and procedures. Namely, Section
2.5.1 states: “Violations that are not subject to the Progressive Discipline policy and will
result in immediate discharge include … willful falsification of a time record.”

Enclosed please find your final check, which represents payment for all days worked
through today (including vacation and holidays). You will be notified by the Benefits
Office of any benefit continuation for which you may be eligible.

Sincerely,

Don Gaertner
Director, Customer Service

1 This was reported to management by a coworker who was tired of watching this game go on over an ex-
tended period of time.

-368-

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