Faithful to Fenway: Believing in Boston, Baseball, and America's Most Beloved Ballpark

By Michael Ian Borer | Go to book overview

1
BOSTON BELIEVES
Fenway Park, a “Lyrical Little Bandbox”

At any time of the day when you’re around that ballpark, it personi-
fies the city. Fenway’s worn at the edges like its occupants and fans.
It’s like the womb that Bostonians and New Englanders are birthed
from; it’s as if there’s a piece of Fenway in them.

—Ed Berliner, host and managing editor
of CN8 Sports New England

May the Red Sox always play at Fenway Park, and may they win the
World Series in my lifetime.

—message written on a prayer book in an ancient temple in Tokyo

Fenway Park is short on comfort but long on character. It lacks the amenities of many of the newer sports stadiums. There is no Hard Rock Café (as at Toronto’s Skydome), no swimming pool (as at Arizona’s Chase Field), and definitely no sushi (which has become a fan favorite from Seattle to Baltimore). All Fenway Park has are cramped seats, poles that obstruct spectators’ view of the game, a daunting big green wall in left field, a hand-operated scoreboard, and a slew of devoted patrons, pilgrims, and parishioners. It is an old-fashioned ballpark in an old-fashioned city. As the Boston Globe’s Dan Shaughnessy wrote, “There is nothing trendy or hip about Fenway. It is NPR in an MTV world.”1 And yet there is something about Fenway Park, with its feet

-13-

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