Faithful to Fenway: Believing in Boston, Baseball, and America's Most Beloved Ballpark

By Michael Ian Borer | Go to book overview

NOTES

NOTES TO THE INTRODUCTION

1. During a “celebration” a week earlier, after the Red Sox beat the Yankees in the seventh game of the American League Championship Series, that included relatively minor forms of public vandalism, an Emerson College student was killed by a projectile fired by riot police. “Emerson College Student Dies after Postgame Melee,” Denise Lavoie, Boston Globe, 21 October 2004; “Fan Anxiety Turns to Delirium, Rowdiness,” Brian MacQuarrie, Boston Globe, 21 October 2004; “Postgame Police Projectile Kills an Emerson Student: O’Toole Accepts Responsibility but Condemns ‘Punks,’” Thomas Farragher and David Able, Boston Globe, 22 October 2004; “Man Says Police Pellets Hit Him, 2 Others,” Donovan Slack, Boston Globe, 25 October 2004.

2. See Glenn Stout and Richard A. Johnson, Red Sox Century: One Hundred Years of Red Sox Baseball (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2004).

3. Quoted in Dan Shaughnessy, The Curse of the Bambino (New York: Penguin Books, 1990), 19.

4. The case of Bill Buckner is a poignant example of the construction of melodramatic narratives in American sport and popular culture. For any social problem, assuming that we could call the Red Sox’s collapse in the 1986 World Series a social problem, different groups and individuals are designated as victims, villains, or heroes. Buckner was immediately labeled the villain, taking his seat in Red Sox history next to Babe Ruth and Bucky Dent. Buckner is even on the cover of Shaughnessy’s The Curse of the Bambino. After the Red Sox victory in 2004, there was a public outpouring of forgiveness for Buckner. Viewers could see fans, anticipating a win, holding a sign in Busch Stadium during Game 4 that read “We Forgive Bill Buckner.” But Buckner was

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