NOTES

Introduction

1. The only recent attempt to deploy genre as a concept in the discussion of photography is in Paul Frosh’s book, The Image Factory (Oxford: Berg, 2003).

2. Steve Neale, ‘Questions of Genre’, Screen (Oxford University Press, volume 31, number 1, spring 1990), p 45.

3. Steve Neale, Genre (London: BFI, 1980).

4. Neale, ‘Questions of Genre’, Screen, p 46.

5. Hal Foster, et al., Art Since 1900: Modernism, Antimodernism, Postmodernism (London: Thames & Hudson, 2004).


Chapter 1 History

1. Sigmund Freud, ‘Civilization and its Discontents’ [1930], Civilization, Society and Religion, Pelican Freud, Volume 12 (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1989), p 279.

2. Raymond Williams, Keywords (London: Fontana, 1988).

3. See for example: Helmet and Alison Gernsheim, The History of Photography (London: Oxford University Press, 1955); Jean-Claude Lemagny and André Rouille, eds., A History of Photography (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1987); Naomi Rosenblum, A World History of Photography (London: Abbeville, 1984); Michel Frizot, ed., A New History of Photography (Cologne: Könemann, 1998) [1994 in French]; The History of Japanese Photography, Kaneko Ryüichi et al. (Houston: Museum of Fine Arts, 2003).

4. The essay has been reprinted several times since 1971; see Linda Nochlin, Women, Art, and Power and Other Essays (London: Thames & Hudson, 1989).

5. Karl Marx, ‘The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte’, Marx/Engels: Selected Works (London: Lawrence & Wishart, 1980), p 96.

6. Karl Marx, ‘The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte’, p 96.

7. The book was originally based on a 1937 exhibition and catalogue called Photography, 1839–1937, held at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. See Beaumont Newhall, The History of Photography: From 1939 to the Present Day (New York: Museum of Modern Art, 1964).

8. See Christopher Phillips, ‘The Judgement Seat of Photography’, The Contest of Meaning, R. Bolton, ed. (London: MIT, 1992), p 196.

9. See, for example, the work of Abigail Solomon-Godeau, especially ‘Calotypomania’ and ‘Cannon Fodder’; both in Photography at the Dock (Minneapolis: Minnesota Press, 1995).

10. John Tagg, The Burden of Representation (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1988), p 118.

11. See Michel Foucault, The Archaeology of Knowledge (London: Tavistock, 1985).

-171-

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Photography: The Key Concepts
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1- History 8
  • 2- Photography Theory 24
  • 3- Documentary and Story-Telling 45
  • 4- Looking at Portraits 67
  • 5- in the Landscape 89
  • 6- The Rhetoric of Still Life 111
  • 7- Art Photography 129
  • 8- Global Photography 147
  • Questions for Essays and Class Discussion 163
  • Annotated Guide for Further Reading 167
  • Notes 171
  • Select Bibliography 183
  • Index 191
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