Beyond Bullsh*t: Straight-Talk at Work

By Samuel A. Culbert | Go to book overview

APPENDIX A
Alignment Questions1

1. BUM RAP

Think of a “bum rap” or stereotype that someone has used in characterizing you and your limitations. State what goes unrecognized when you are portrayed this way, or what is unfair, and explain why the criticisms implied in this portrayal are too simplistic or categorical. State whether you have taken any action to counteract this exaggerated representation of you. If you have, what did you do? If not, why haven’t you challenged this characterization?


2. INTENTION

What are you now trying to prove or demonstrate to others or to yourself? Explain why proving this is important. Then, if possible, describe an incident that illustrates how what you are trying to prove is reflected in your behavior.


3. WORK SUCCESS

Describe a work assignment that you take particular pride in having performed as well as you did (perhaps one from a former job or position). What was the personal significance to this accomplishment? What strengths or capacities were demonstrated? How were you challenged? Were any self-doubts involved? What does this accomplishment illustrate about your upbringing and what you had to overcome as an adult?

-137-

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Beyond Bullsh*t: Straight-Talk at Work
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword Palimpsest ix
  • Prologue xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1- Getting Straight-Talk at Work 3
  • Theory Section- Bullsht 13
  • 2- Bullsht Is It the Nemesis? 15
  • 3- Bullsht It's Essential to Corporate Harmony 23
  • 4- Bullsht Corporate Pretense Cancels Human Nature 30
  • Theory Section—Straight-Talk 43
  • 5- Straight-Talk I-Speak Required 45
  • 6- Straight-Talk How Does It Differ from Truth-Telling and Candor? 54
  • 7- Straight-Talk Relationship Is King 59
  • Applications Section 69
  • 8- Straight-Talk When Is It Possible with the Boss? 71
  • 9- Straight-Talk Benefits/Liabilities 86
  • 10- Straight-Talk Conditions for Getting It 95
  • 11- Straight-Talk Truth-Finding 110
  • Conclusion 123
  • 12- Straight-Talk It Pays to Advertise 125
  • Appendix a Alignment Questions 137
  • Acknowledgments 141
  • Notes 145
  • Index 149
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