Drug War Zone: Frontline Dispatches from the Streets of El Paso and Juaarez

By Howard Campbell | Go to book overview

The Roots of Contraband Smuggling in El Paso

La Nacha’s life story chronicles the rise of drug trafficking in Ciudad Juárez. Fred (“Freddy”) Morales, a historian and longtime El Pasoan, complements her story with an account of the evolution of the El Paso drug trade, which has always been closely connected with Juárez.

When he was still a child, Freddy and his family moved to the oldest Mexican neighborhood in El Paso, the area known as el barrio de Chihuahuita. Chihuahuita lies west, and in the shadow, of the international bridge that crosses the Rio Grande/Río Bravo and divides downtown El Paso from downtown Ciudad Juárez. As an adult, Freddy began collecting documents and artifacts concerned with Ciudad Juárez and El Paso, including all he could find about Chihuahuita’s history. His research was helped by the fact that he grew up in the neighborhood and has lived, even as an adult, in various parts of the barrio. Morales experienced firsthand the traditional role Chihuahuita has played as an unofficial (that is, illegal) gateway into the United States for smugglers and their merchandise, and undocumented immigrants.

Freddy’s knowledge of El Paso barrio history, gang culture and territories, and the many tecato (junkie) venues and smuggling operations from the 1940s through the 1970s—and in some cases to the present—is nonpareil. Morales’s narrative illustrates the rich cultural life of El Paso barrios and a dynamic smuggling economy that continues today. Although many of the gangs Morales discusses have disappeared, the Barrio Azteca–Aztecas gang has become a key smuggling and localdistribution cell of the Juárez cartel. The gang also controls much of the vast street and prison retail drug trade in the El Paso–Juárez area, although other drug gangs and independent operators also abound.

-53-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Drug War Zone: Frontline Dispatches from the Streets of El Paso and Juaarez
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 310

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.