First Available Cell: Desegregation of the Texas Prison System

By Chad R. Trulson; James W. Marquart | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

No undertaking of this magnitude can be accomplished without assistance and support from numerous individuals.

We would first like to thank those Texas Department of Corrections (TDC) officials who opened the door for us when we first began this project. For nearly a decade, TDC administrators, officers, and staff have been extremely open and inviting to us, despite our constant pestering. Sherman Bell took the time to meet with us and supported our project from the beginning. Ron Steffa and Wendy Ingram helped us to navigate initial barriers to our research. Amy Clute was invaluable to the research in the beginning stages and served as the link to many other TDC administrators, officers, and staff that benefited this research. Dimitria Pope and Marty Martin were extremely helpful to us when we approached TDC for a second time in 2005. Karen Hall, Brenda Riley, and Riley Tilley, of TDC Executive Services, assisted in the final aspects of this research. Jim Willett, director of the Texas Prison Museum and retired TDC officer and former warden, helped us track down many of the illustrations for this book. Without the support of these and many other present and former TDC personnel, this book would not have been possible.

Thanks also to Dr. Bruce Jackson, SUNY Buffalo, for allowing us to use photographs from his collection on Texas prisons. We also gratefully acknowledge the assistance of Jene Robbins, Digital Imaging Specialist, TDCJ Media Services, for her assistance with various photographs. We also thank Gerald Birnberg, attorney for Allen Lamar, who provided insight to the background and legal issues of the Lamar suit.

Thanks to the many TDC offenders who provided valuable perspective to this research over the years. Without their insight, this book would have

-xii-

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First Available Cell: Desegregation of the Texas Prison System
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xii
  • Introduction xiv
  • From Segregation to Desegregation in Texas Prisons- A Timeline xvi
  • Part I - The outside 1
  • Chapter 1 - Broken Barriers 3
  • Chapter 2 - An Institutional Fault Line 15
  • Chapter 3 - 18,000 Days 42
  • Part II - The Inside 59
  • Chapter 4 - The Color Line Persists 61
  • Chapter 5 - Cracks in the Color Line 89
  • Chapter 6 - Full Assault on the Color Line 111
  • Chapter 7 - The Color Line Breaks 134
  • Chapter 8 - 7,000 Days Later 163
  • Chapter 9 - Life in the First Available Cell 176
  • Part III - A Colorless Society? 201
  • Chapter 10 - The Most Unlikely Place 203
  • Notes 225
  • Select Bibliography 265
  • Index 269
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