Left of Hollywood: Cinema, Modernism, and the Emergence of U.S. Radical Film Culture

By Chris Robé | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

As with any sustained creative endeavor, numerous people have influenced the shape and trajectory of this one. I would like to thank first of all the members of my dissertation committee—Alex Doty, Dawn Keetley, and Seth Moglen—who slogged through an avalanche of drafts, going far above and beyond the call of duty. Coming in a close second is the dissertation reading group—Lisa Vetere, John Lennon, Tony Bleach, Tracey Cummings, Harry Brown, and Bob Kilker—which at least had the buffer of cheap beer to endure a still-unfocused project.

Florida Atlantic University has provided an ideal environment in which to complete this project. Eric Freedman and Mike Budd are two of the best colleagues anyone could wish to work with; they shared valuable feedback that sharpened the material. Ryan Moore provoked many late-night discussions regarding the Frankfurt School, thereby assisting in theoretically orienting the manuscript and proving once again the value of Marxist thought in forging meaningful relationships. I would like to thank the graduate students of my Historiography and the Archeology of Film and Media Studies course, who further assisted in indirectly theorizing the project. A Scholarly and Creative Accomplishment Fellowship in the fall of 2007 provided needed course-release time to complete the manuscript.

Numerous people also vitally assisted in collecting archival materials. Ron Magliozzi and Charles Silver of the Film Studies Center in the Museum of Modern Art offered tremendous assistance in tracking down needed resources, often of their own initiative. Tom Brandon, although I never met him, was a pioneer and ceaseless archivist of 1930s Left film culture, supplying the foundations for many studies still to come. The librarians of the New York Public Library were incredibly helpful in tracking down esoteric periodicals. The interlibrary-loan staff of both Lehigh University and Florida Atlantic University diligently answered my numerous requests for “just one more” document.

I would like to thank the anonymous readers of Cinema Journal and the Velvet Light Trap who supplied vital revision comments regarding

-vii-

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