Leon Uris: Life of a Best Seller

By Ira B. Nadel | Go to book overview

10
RETURN

I’m no Solzhenitsyn … but I’ll rest on my titles. I’ve written
two novels—Exodus and Trinity—that have had some
world impact. Things could be worse.

—LEON URIS, WASHINGTON POST, 2 MAY 1978

URIS’S SELF-ASSESSMENT was not entirely wrong, acknowledging his successes while admitting his shortcomings. By the time this article appeared, Trinity had already sold more than 1.6 million copies. He could afford to both criticize and praise himself. And Trinity was an important book because it “destroyed an essential myth: that I am a Jewish writer.”1 Implicitly, he meant that he was also an Irish, even a world, writer.

Uris’s reputation, however, was still ambiguous and partly undermined by his divorce from his literary contemporaries. A long interview in Writer’s Digest summarized his attitude, expressed through disdain for writers like Norman Mailer: “He’s not a novelist at all. I think he’s a public masturbator.”2 On the Nobel Prize: “If Norman Mailer wins it, I’ll probably kill myself. I mean, I don’t expect to win it because I am too popular.” But he admired some American writers, notably Tennessee Williams, James Michener, and John Hersey. Steinbeck was also a hero. He summarized his own work by declaring, “My basic material deals with injustice in this world and the striving for that thing we call freedom.”

Uris’s pseudoclaim to being Irish was confirmed in February 1978 when he received the John F. Kennedy Medal, awarded by the Irish American Society of New York. It was a gala evening at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York, and the key Doubleday people were invited: Ken McCormick, Sam Vaughan, John Sargent, and Joan Ward, Ken McCormick’s assistant. Later that year, Uris received the gold medal of the Eire Society of Boston.

Leading up to this event, however, was a period of distraction and confusion. He was unsure of his next book, switching topics from Israel to South Africa, showing again that travel, research, and politically charged cultures were what he needed to stimulate his creativity. But first came sales. At the end of 1976, he had told Ken McCormick that he did not want to deal with the Literary Guild

-233-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Leon Uris: Life of a Best Seller
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Abbreviations viii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Prologue - [American Marine, Jewish Writer] 1
  • 1 - [the Truth Will Rise] 10
  • 2 - Eagle, Globe, and Anchor 29
  • 3 - Battle Cry at Larkspur 52
  • 4 - Hollywood 72
  • 5 - Exodus, or [the Book] 93
  • 6 - History and Resistance 123
  • 7 - Love and Litigation 169
  • 8 - [Short Titles, Long Books, Big Sales] 193
  • 9 - Ireland 209
  • 10 - Return 233
  • 11 - Russian Renewal 255
  • 12 - Redemption, or America Redux 280
  • Epilogue 303
  • Notes 305
  • Index 343
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 352

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.