Muslim Reformers in Iran and Turkey: The Paradox of Moderation

By Güneş Murat Tezcür | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 8
A Tale of
Two Elections

The Reform Front in Iran and the Justice and Development Party in Turkey have been the most prominent post-Islamist movements in the Middle East. Neither the RF nor the JDP shared a holistic ideological vision that left little room for pluralism and democratic governance. In fact, the birth of the RF and the JDP followed internal debates and criticism regarding the promises of the Islamist ideology. The Iranian Revolution resulted in authoritarian rule that suffered from chronic socioeconomic problems. The central theme of the RF’s discourse was the increasing gap between revolutionary ideals and the reality of the Islamic Republic. The RF developed a powerful criticism of the state-centric nature of Islamist ideology and offered an alternative vision emphasizing civil society, rule of law, and societal rights and freedoms. Despite the broad appeal of its platform, it failed to become the dominant force in Iran for two reasons. Primarily, and consistent with Proposition IVr (see Table 2.1) that problematizes the relationship between behavioral moderation and democratic progress, the RF did not pursue a nonelectoral confrontational strategy of political change. Second, it did not have the means to implement policies of social welfare and to weaken the state’s control over economic production and distribution. A central reason for the victory of Ahmedinejad in the June 2005 presidential election was widespread discontent caused by chronic inflation, unemployment, underemployment, corruption, and lack of economic opportunities. Ironically, broad segments of the Iranian society perceived Ahmedinejad as an “outsider” who would reform the corrupt and wasteful system and fulfill the social justice message of the revolution.

Turkish Islamists had a very unique trajectory, as they had regularly participated in elections since the early 1970s. A younger generation of Islamists, backed by liberals, developed a criticism of Islamism and of the secularist ruling ideology since the early 1990s. They took advantage of electoral opportunities and public discontent caused by socioeconomic downturn. The JDP,

-177-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Muslim Reformers in Iran and Turkey: The Paradox of Moderation
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 306

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.