Using Deliberative Techniques to Teach United States History

By Eleanora Von Dehsen; Nancy Claxton | Go to book overview

14. Women’s Suffrage

INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
Students will be able to:
Explain how women achieved the vote
Understand the contemporary arguments presented for and against suffrage
Understand the cultural dimensions behind the arguments

DESCRIPTION
Working in small groups, students will develop a campaign to promote women’s suffrage at the beginning of the 20th century.
TIME
Two class periods
MATERIALS
Women’s Suffrage Chronology (copy for each student) Debating Suffrage (copy for each student) On to Victory! (copy for each student)
CLASS LAYOUT AND GROUPING OF STUDENTS
Students will work in small groups to prepare their campaigns. The class will hear and debate the campaign plans in their usual seating assignments.
PROCEDURE
Day 1:
1. Explain that the campaign for women’s suffrage stretched from the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848 into the 20th century. Distribute Women’s Suffrage Chronology and present a short overview of 19th century developments, emphasizing the following:
Women’s suffrage was a radical idea even to those at the Seneca Falls Convention
Supporters of women’s rights and abolitionists worked together to further both goals until the Civil War prompted the two groups to focus on emancipation
The postwar debate over who should get priority (women or male African Americans) in the campaign for voting rights ends the alliance between former abolitionists and women’s rights activists, and splits the women’s rights movement. The National

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