Education beyond the Mesas: Hopi Students at Sherman Institute, 1902-1929

By Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert | Go to book overview

Preface

This book is first and foremost a historical account of the Hopi people of northeastern Arizona and their experiences at Sherman Institute, an off-reservation Indian boarding school in Riverside, California. The Hopi Tribe possesses no greater historical source than its people. Therefore, a book on the Hopi people should also rely on the involvement and cooperation of the Hopi Tribe. The protection of intellectual property has long been a concern for American Indians, and in response to years of misrepresentations of Hopi culture by Hopis and non-Hopis, the Hopi Tribe established the Hopi Culture Preservation Office (HCPO) in Kykotsmovi, Arizona. Since its founding in the 1980s, the HCPO has acted as a protector of Hopi intellectual property and determined rules and regulations for those who wish to perform research on the Hopi Reservation. Although in the past some researchers have bypassed community involvement and permission when they conducted research on the reservation, I made certain that the Hopi Tribe had a central role in a book that involved the Hopi people.

To accomplish this, I sought the assistance of Leigh J. Kuwanwisiwma from the village of Bacavi, director of the HCPO, and Stewart B. Koyiyumptewa from the village of Hotevilla, archivist for the Hopi Tribe. Both of these officials made helpful comments and suggestions on various aspects of my research,

-ix-

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Education beyond the Mesas: Hopi Students at Sherman Institute, 1902-1929
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction xvii
  • 1 - Hopi Resistance 1
  • 2 - Policies and Assimilation 29
  • 3 - The Orayvi Split and Hopi Schooling 51
  • 4 - Elder in Residence 71
  • 5 - Taking Hopi Knowledge to School 95
  • 6 - Learning to Preach 115
  • 7 - Returning to Hopi 137
  • Conclusion 163
  • Appendix - A Retelling of Jus-Wa-Kep-la 171
  • Notes 175
  • Bibliography 207
  • Index 219
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