Education beyond the Mesas: Hopi Students at Sherman Institute, 1902-1929

By Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert | Go to book overview

Notes

Abbreviations
ARCIAAnnual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs
ARDIAnnual Report of the Department of the Interior
NARANational Archives and Records Administration
NEANational Education Association
RGRecord Group
SSCFSherman Student Case Files
YMCAYoung Men’s Christian Association
YWCAYoung Women’s Christian Association

Introduction

1. Leigh J. Kuwanwisiwma interview, March 21, 2006, Bacavi AZ, Hopi Reservation (hereafter cited as Kuwanwisiwma interview, March 21, 2006). In this interview, Kuwanwisiwma noted that the “fourth way of life” has often been described as the “fourth world” in popular American culture. However, the Hopi people consider this present world to be the “fourth way of life” for Hopis and for all humanity.

2. The Hopi emergence and migration stories are complicated and full of many more details than I have provided in these first two paragraphs. Each clan has their version of these stories, and they differ in emphasis from village to village. One important figure in these stories, whom I do not discuss in detail, is Ma’saw (Maasau), the Great Spirit and “Creator and leader” of Hopi ancestral lands. For more information on Ma’saw and the Hopi emergence and migrations stories from Hopi perspectives, see Alfred Hermequaftewa, The Hopi Way of Life is the Way of Peace, transcription of interview recorded by Thomas B. Noble (Indianapolis: Merideth Guillet, 1970), 1–9, and Nequatewa, Truth of a Hopi, 1–15. Also,

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Education beyond the Mesas: Hopi Students at Sherman Institute, 1902-1929
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction xvii
  • 1 - Hopi Resistance 1
  • 2 - Policies and Assimilation 29
  • 3 - The Orayvi Split and Hopi Schooling 51
  • 4 - Elder in Residence 71
  • 5 - Taking Hopi Knowledge to School 95
  • 6 - Learning to Preach 115
  • 7 - Returning to Hopi 137
  • Conclusion 163
  • Appendix - A Retelling of Jus-Wa-Kep-la 171
  • Notes 175
  • Bibliography 207
  • Index 219
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