Reservation Reelism: Redfacing, Visual Sovereignty, and Representations of Native Americans in Film

By Michelle H. Raheja | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book would not have been possible without the generosity, encouragement, good humor, and support of a legion of colleagues, friends, and family. I have been truly blessed to bring this project to completion under the guidance of such wonderful people and I am eternally grateful. I am indebted to so many that it is difficult to single out individuals and I apologize to those whose names I have not included. I am fortunate to be a member of a collegial and supportive academic department. The English department at the University of California, Riverside (UCR) has consistently and unflaggingly challenged and encouraged this project. Sincere and humble thanks to Katherine Kinney — who served as a steadfast, skillful, and compassionate chair — and to Susan Brown, Kathleen Carter, Tina Feldman, Linda Nellany, and Cindy Redfield, staff members who make good things happen. UCR has been an intellectually rigorous and inspiring place from which to write this book. Special thanks to my wonderful and exceptional mentors, colleagues, and friends at UCR, many of whom graciously read chapters of this book and who all provided inspiration, support, and sagacity: Geoff Cohen, Stephen Cullenberg, Jennifer Doyle, Lan Duong, Erica Edwards, Keith Harris, Katherine Kinney, Monte Kugel, Molly McGarry, Dylan Rodríguez, Freya Schiwy, Andrea Smith, Cliff Trafzer, and Jonathan Walton. My most appreciative thanks to the brilliant members of my writing groups, who generously read and commented on versions of this book and encouraged me to continue when my enthusiasm for this project flagged: Amalia Cabezas, Tammy Ho, Jodi Kim, Tiffany Lopez, Vorris Nunley, Jacqueline Shea Murphy, Setsu Shigematsu, and Traise Yamamoto. To Lindon

-xv-

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