Soccer Stories: Anecdotes, Oddities, Lore, and Amazing Feats

By Donn Risolo | Go to book overview

10

SNAFUS

Robert Maxwell has just bought
Brighton & Hove Albion, and he’s
furious to find it is only one club.
TOMMY DOCHERTY, scottish coach,
on the new owner of the modest English club

John Harkes Going to sheffield,
Wednesday
NEW YORK POST headline over a
report on the U.s. National Team midfielder’s
move to the English Premier League club
sheffield Wednesday

The English call a dreadful mistake by a player a “howler.” Here is a kaleidoscope of howlers.


Good Intentions Gone Wrong

Despite the violence and corruption that stain the sport, soccer remains a game in which the players enter the field walking side by side and concludes, on special occasions, with the combatants exchanging jerseys.

And there’s one other shining example of sportsmanship that’s a soccer staple: when Team A purposely kicks a ball over the touchline to stop play and allow an injured player to receive medical treatment, a Team B player will then toss the ball back to a Team A player on the ensuing throw-in.

Sometimes, however, that sporting gesture goes awry.

In February 1999 Arsenal and Sheffield United were tied, 1–1, in the fifth round of the English F.A. Cup in London when United’s Lee Morris was tackled inside the Arsenal area. No penalty kick was awarded and play continued on the other side of the field before a

-279-

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Soccer Stories: Anecdotes, Oddities, Lore, and Amazing Feats
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • 1 - Everyone, Everywhere 1
  • 2 - History 13
  • 3 - Worldcup 51
  • 4 - Misbehavior 89
  • 5 - Soccer, War, and Peace 135
  • 6 - America 169
  • 7 - Referees 223
  • 8 - Coaches 247
  • 9 - Superlatives 259
  • 10 - Snafus 279
  • 11 - Tragedies 313
  • 12 - Only in Soccer 337
  • Bibliographic Essay 387
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