Pragmatism in the Americas

By Gregory Fernando Pappas | Go to book overview

Preface

The impact and promise of pragmatism in the Hispanic world and beyond North America have been neither appreciated nor documented. I am grateful to Peter Hare, Jorge Gracia, Douglas Browning, and John J. McDermott for insisting years ago that I pursue and lead the requisite inquiry. The inquiry for this book was facilitated by my recent travels to Spain, Peru, Colombia, Puerto Rico, Brazil, Argentina, and Mexico. I am happy to acknowledge the institutional support that I have received from Texas A&M University to travel and to have a faculty development leave to devote myself fully to this project. Thanks to Tomas Alexander, Douglas Anderson, Jaime Nubiola, and many other members of the Society for the Advancement of Philosophy for their encouragement. I am indebted to Cyndy Brown for her help with editing, and everyone at Fordham University Press has been splendid.

I gratefully acknowledge the Diego Rivera estate and the City College of San Francisco for the permission to use Rivera’s Pan-American Unity mural for the cover. Earlier versions of a few of the essays in this book where published elsewhere. I am grateful to publishers of the journals for the permission to use “John Dewey in Spain and in Spanish America” by Antón Donoso (International Philosophical Quarterly Volume 41, No. 3, September 2001); “Dewey and Ortega on the Starting Point” by Douglas Browning (Transactions of the Charles Peirce Society Vol. XXXIV, No. 1); “The Latino Character of American pragmatism” by Gregory Fernando Pappas (Transactions of the Charles Peirce Society Vol. XXXIV, No. 1 1998); and “Dewey and Latina Lesbians on the Quest for Purity” by Gregory Fernando Pappas (Journal of Speculative Philosophy, Vol. 15, issue 2, 2001).

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Pragmatism in the Americas
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 372

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.