The United States and the Second World War: New Perspectives on Diplomacy, War, and the Home Front

By G. Kurt Piehler; Sidney Pash | Go to book overview

PREFACE

This anthology honors John Whiteclay Chambers II—my dissertation advisor, mentor, colleague, and friend. In conceiving this volume as series editor, I sought to pay tribute to John’s distinguished record of scholarship and teaching, as well as his support in launching Fordham University Press’s “World War II: The Global, Human, and Ethical Dimension” series. John has served on the advisory board since the series was formally announced in 2000, and over the past several years, has offered wise counsel and guidance.

This volume bears the imprint of John’s ideas and his impact on the writing and teaching of history. Although this volume is not conceived as a narrow festschrift, all the contributors who participated in the volume have some relationship or connection with John; some were his students, and others have been longstanding colleagues. These essays cover a diverse range of themes related to the Second World War and are characteristic of John’s intellectual interests. No easy labels apply to John’s scholarship: He is a historian of war but also of peace. John has served as both president of the Peace History Society as well as nominee for the presidency of the Society for Military History. He has written on a diverse range of subjects, including conscription during World War I, the role of the peace movement in American foreign policy, conscientious objection to military service, the Progressive era, the ex-presidency, the Office of Strategic Services, and war and film. A prolific scholar, he has contributed works in multiple genres, authoring monographs, official histories, scholarly articles, edited anthologies, a textbook, and a major reference work, The Oxford Companion to American Military History. He has received several distinguished scholarly awards, including the Distinguished Book Award in 1988 from the Society of Military History for To Raise an Army: The Draft Comes to Modern America.

John is a proponent of peace, but he also understands the military mind. Although no scholar can be completely bias free, John brings both

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