The Mother in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction: Psychoanalysis, Photography, Deconstruction

By Elissa Marder | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book was born over a long period of time. While most of the texts contained in it were composed fairly recently, a few of them were written long ago. Looking back, I recall that many years ago, after a lecture I had given on Blade Runner at the University of Rochester, my dear friend Sharon Willis asked me to explain what I meant by the term “mother.” At the time, I was unable to articulate why I found the uncanny, photographic image of the mother to be so fascinating and so central to the film’s concerns. In many ways, this book is the belated response to that question.

Given the long and complex genesis of the book, it is impossible for me to thank everyone who participated in all of its various stages over the years. I would like to thank a number of people, however, whose help and generosity were crucial to its emergence as a book. I am deeply grateful to the entire team at Fordham University Press. Helen Tartar, my editor, has been supportive and enthusiastic about the project from the very beginning. Thomas Lay oversaw the whole process with diligence and care. I would also like to thank Gregory McNamee for his sensitive and judicious copy editing of the manuscript. Kelly Oliver and David Wills both read the entire manuscript and offered generous and helpful suggestions for revisions. Hélène Cixous, Peggy Kamuf, and Avital Ronell offered continued inspiration and support. Elizabeth Rottenberg provided intellectual encouragement, keen insight, and warm friendship throughout the process. Several of the pieces in this book started off as invited lectures and/or contributions to journals and collected volumes. I would like to thank the following organizers and editors (some of whom are also friends) for including me in their various projects: Jennifer Bajorek, Jeanne Wolf Bernstein, Bruno Chaouat, Diane Davis, Mark Dawson, Karen Jacobs, Martin McQuillan, Steven

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