Medieval Poetics and Social Practice: Responding to the Work of Penn R. Szittya

By Seeta Chaganti | Go to book overview

NOTES

INTRODUCTION/SEETA CHAGANTI

1. http://tiny.cc/lannan-about; Adrienne Rich, “Why I Refused the National Medal for the Arts,” Los Angeles Times, 3 August 1997 (http://tiny.cc/MED-poetical [18 July 2011]).

2. http://tiny.cc/lannan-about.

3. See, for example, Michelle Bolduc, The Medieval Poetics of Contraries (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2006); Mark C. Amodio, Writing the Oral Tradition: Oral Poetics and Literate Culture in Medieval England (South Bend, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 2005); Katherine O’Brien O’Keeffe, Visible Song: Transitional Literacy in Old English Verse (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2006); Sarah Stanbury, Seeing the Gawain-Poet: Description and the Act of Perception (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1991); Peggy McCracken, “The Poetics of Sacrifice: Allegory and Myth in the Grail Quest,” Yale French Studies 95 (1999): 152–68; Robert J. Meyer-Lee, Poets and Power from Chaucer to Wyatt (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007); Emily Steiner, Documentary Culture and the Making of Medieval English Literature (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2003); and Logan E. Whalen, Marie de France and the Poetics of Memory (Washington, D.C.: Catholic University of America Press, 2008).

4. On this conception of formalist poetic reading, see Seth Lerer, “The Endurance of Formalism in Middle English Studies,” Literature Compass 1 (2003): 10–11.

5. Glending Olson, “Making and Poetry in the Age of Chaucer,” Comparative Literature 31.3 (1979): 277. Here Olson suggests that Deschamps’ use of the name Philomela to designate the nightingale provides “a means of rendering one’s work more ‘poetical.’”

6. Deborah M. Sinnreich-Levy, “Deschamps’ L’Art de dictier: Just What Kind of Poetics Is It?” in The Rhetorical Poetics of the Middle Ages: Reconstructive Polyphony: Essays in Honor of Robert O. Payne, ed. John M. Hill and Deborah M. Sinnreich-Levy (London: Associated University Presses, 2000), 36: “Deschamps espouses an expressive poetics that rises from whatever urges the poet must express or whatever subjects he must explain.”

7. Middle English Dictionary, s.v. “poetical,” http://tiny.cc/MED-poetical.

8. John Lydgate, The Fall of Princes, ed. H. Bergen, Early English Text Society, e.s. 123 (London: Oxford University Press, 1924; repr., 1967), 9.3325. Elsewhere in the poem as well, processe designates a narrative account (1.127, 3.2143, 9.716).

9. Middle English Dictionary, s.v. “profunde.”

-195-

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