Creating a New Racial Order: How Immigration, Multiracialism, Genomics, and the Young Can Remake Race in America

By Jennifer Hochschild; Vesla Weaver et al. | Go to book overview

List of Figures and Tables
Figures
Figure 1.1.Ethnic and racial categories on the 2010 census5
Figure 1.2.What is a race?14–15
Figure 2.1.Foreign-born people in the United States: number and share of the population, 1850–200924
Figure 2.2.Persons obtaining legal permanent resident status in the United States25
Figure 2.3.Procedural flow chart for enumerating people of Spanish heritage, 1970 census30
Figure 2.4.Hate crimes against groups, as percentage of total hate crimes, 1995–200840
Figure 2.5.Immigration cartoons54
Figure 3.1.Interracial marriage rates, 1880–200062
Figure 3.2.Identification with racial mixture in major surveys67
Figure 3.3.comparison of self-identified biracials and monoracials, combined 2006–8 ACS74–75
Figure 3.4.Books about racial mixture81
Figure 4.1.Genomics as art86–87
Figure 4.2.Genetic map of Europe90
Figure 4.3.Ancestry proportions in thirteen mestizo populations91
Figure 4.4.Genomics cartoons111
Figure 5.1.Proportions of native-born adults with at least some college, 1980 and 2009, by race or ethnicity117
Figure 5.2.Percent of college-educated Whites’ median income held by college-educated non-Whites, by age group, 1980 and 2009122
Figure 5.3.“Lazy,” by age group, race, and year, GSS 1990–2008130
Figure 5.4.“Lack of willpower,” by age group, race, and year, GSS 1977–2008131
Figure 5.5.“Racial discrimination is no longer a major problem in America,” first-year college students, 1992–2008134
Figure 5.6.Proportions of students attending schools with others of their race or ethnicity, 1995 and 2007137
Figure 6.1.Sentenced prisoners in state and federal prisons by race or ethnicity, 1960–2008146
Figure 6.2.Median net worth, by monthly household income quintile and race or ethnicity, 1984 and 2002150

-xi-

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Creating a New Racial Order: How Immigration, Multiracialism, Genomics, and the Young Can Remake Race in America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Figures and Tables xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • Part I - The Argument 1
  • 1 - Destabilizing the American Racial Order 3
  • Part II - Creating a New Order 19
  • 2 - Immigration 21
  • 3 - Multiracialism 56
  • 4 - Genomics 83
  • 5 - Cohort Change 113
  • 6 - Blockages to Racial Transformation 139
  • Part III - Possibilities 165
  • 7 - The Future of the American Racial Order 167
  • Notes 183
  • References 213
  • Index 255
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