Creating a New Racial Order: How Immigration, Multiracialism, Genomics, and the Young Can Remake Race in America

By Jennifer Hochschild; Vesla Weaver et al. | Go to book overview

7
The Future of the American Racial Order

If we haven’t reached this point we’re getting close to reaching it, where there
are going to be more African Americans in this country who never
experienced anything remotely close to Jim Crow than those who lived under
Jim Crow. That, obviously, changes perspectives.
—President Barack Obama

I consider myself Mexican-American, both parts of that phrase. I don’t want
to turn my back on my mother’s generation. But we are less burdened.
—Mayor Julián Castro of San Antonio

[Politics is] a bunch of white people just trying to get together and just trying
to get Blacks back into slavery.
—young Black man from Chicago

Evidence is a very tricky thing. … It may seem to point very straight to one
thing, but if you shift your own point of view a little, you may find it pointing
in an equally uncompromising manner to something entirely different.
—Sherlock Holmes

SHERLOCK HOLMES’S OBSERVATION applies not only to murder but also to politics and social science research. One’s judgment of the nature and trajectory of the American racial order can shift dramatically depending on which evidence is placed in the foreground or pushed into the background. Douglas Massey provides evidence that the United States is on the verge of subjecting undocumented Mexican immigrants “to the harshest, most exploitive, and cruelest treatment that human beings are capable of inflicting on one another.” An equally eminent sociologist, Richard Alba, provides different evidence, showing that “non-zero-sum mobility in the near future [will] allow changes to soften boundaries that we currently see as rigidly racial, like those disadvantaging African Americans and Hispanics.” In 2009, the historian Peniel Joseph wrote that “it was only a matter of time until the myth of postracism exploded in our collective national face”—but in the same year Congressman Steve Cohen boasted in the New York Times that “we’ve come a long way in Memphis, and ours is a story of postracial politics.” The political scientist Cathy Cohen analyzes “the many young black people who are living lives of alienation, marginality, and confusion” due to American

-167-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Creating a New Racial Order: How Immigration, Multiracialism, Genomics, and the Young Can Remake Race in America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Figures and Tables xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • Part I - The Argument 1
  • 1 - Destabilizing the American Racial Order 3
  • Part II - Creating a New Order 19
  • 2 - Immigration 21
  • 3 - Multiracialism 56
  • 4 - Genomics 83
  • 5 - Cohort Change 113
  • 6 - Blockages to Racial Transformation 139
  • Part III - Possibilities 165
  • 7 - The Future of the American Racial Order 167
  • Notes 183
  • References 213
  • Index 255
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 260

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.