Irish Nationalists and the Making of the Irish Race

By Bruce Nelson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIVE
“From the Cabins of Connemara to the
Kraals of Kaffirland”

IRISH NATIONALISTS, THE BRITISH EMPIRE, AND THE “BOER
FIGHT FOR FREEDOM”

From the China towers of Pekin to the round towers
of Ireland, from the cabins of Connemara to the kraals
of Kaffirland, from the wattled homes of the isles of
Polynesia to the wigwams of North America the cry is:
“Down with the invaders! Down with the tyrants!”
Every man to have his own land—every man to have his own home.

—“The West Awake!!!” April 1879

IN THE SECOND HALF OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY, Irish nationalism confronted a new and radically altered world.1 As England became the center of an increasingly large and racially diverse empire, Ireland appeared to shrink. Following the shock of the Great Famine, its population continued to decline steadily.2 Nonetheless, British statesmen convinced themselves that Ireland remained the linchpin of empire, the brick that somehow kept the entire edifice in place. When Liberal prime minister William Gladstone offered concessions to the increasingly insistent Irish demand for home rule, a potent combination of Conservatives and Liberal Unionists expressed dread at the effect “surrender and defeat” in Ireland would have “upon our position in the world—on our moral position, on our material position, on our political position, on our imperial position.” Whatever test India or Egypt or South Africa may have offered at the end of the nineteenth century, John Benyon writes, “there can be little doubt that the real and ultimate ‘Test of Empire’ in this period was Ireland.”3

Irish emigration meant that Ireland itself had become a dispersed nation whose exiled people refused to let go of their Irish identity or—worse—of their enmity toward England. To be Irish was to be “not English”; more than that, to be Irish apparently meant to define oneself over against England and its empire. Particularly in the United States, Irish organizations and newspapers began to exert a disproportionate influence on the evolution of the nationalist movement at home. The American Irish became warm supporters of home rule and the Irish Parliamentary Party, but many of them also offered strong support to

-121-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Irish Nationalists and the Making of the Irish Race
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 333

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.