Economic History of Europe in Modern Times

By Melvin M. Knight; Harry Elmer Barnes et al. | Go to book overview
industrial production. These nations are each others' best potential markets, and often actual ones. Small or poorly equipped plants waste the energies of highly skilled workmen where better machinery would be possible if the market were not divided up into fragments. Possessions outside of Europe are so organized, in many cases, as to become merely fragments of the above fragments, and do not contribute what they might to the prosperity of the whole Continent. The waste is apparent even without counting the direct cost of rivalry in the form of economic and military preparations for possible wars. Many Europeans are keenly aware of these handicaps, and have a lively sense of what might be accomplished if they could be removed or reduced. In this frame of mind various conferences called largely to consider specific problems since the war have discussed far more general reforms. The French industrialist and ex-Minister Louis Loucheur aptly called the pre-war malady of Europe "industrial disorganization," and introduced a resolution in the 1925 meeting of the Assembly of the League of Nations calling for an international conference to study the post-war phase of it in detail. This led to much preliminary work during 1926, and finally to an international economic conference at Geneva in 1927. It can be nothing more than an initial step, but it would be rash to fix bounds to the industrial future of any European country until a thorough attempt has been made to unlock and organize the real possibilities of the Continent.
SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER READING
(See also references given at end of Chapter IV)
* Armitage-Smith G.: The Free Trade Movement and its Results, chaps. V-IX.
* Ashley W. J.: British Industries.
Baines E.: History of the Cotton Manufacture in Great Britain.
Bowley A. L.: Wages in the United Kingdom in the Nineteenth Century.
----- Prices and Wages in the United Kingdom, 1914-1920.
Bready J. W.: Lord Shaftesbury and Social-Industrial Progress.
* Chapman S. J.: The Lancashire Cotton Industry.
* Clapham J. H.: The Woollen and Worsted Industries.

-524-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Economic History of Europe in Modern Times
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 810

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.