Reforming the European Union: Realizing the Impossible

By Daniel Finke; Thomas König et al. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

THIS BOOK ON THE REFORM OF THE EUROPEAN UNION is the result of a multiyear collaborative research project lasting almost as long as the object of study itself. Over the course of this project, we have received valuable comments and suggestions from many colleagues that helped us improve the chapters of this book. We would like to thank Princeton University Press, in particular Chuck Myers, for constant support in the publication process.

Daniel Finke would like to gratefully acknowledge the support of the research project Domestic Structures and European Integration (DOESEI) led by Thomas König and the financial support received under the German Universities Excellence Initiative. He would like to extend special thanks to Simon Hix and Mathew Gabel for commenting on a previous version of this manuscript. He gratefully acknowledges the very efficient research assistance provided by André Graceffa and Denis Schnur.

Tomas König would like to acknowledge the support by the European Commission under grant HPSE-CT-2002–00117 and the input of seven DOSEI project teams: Michael Laver, Ken Benoit, and Raj Chari from Trinity College (Ireland); Simon Hix and Giacomo Benedetto from the London School of Economics and Political Science; Han Dorussen and Hartmut Lenz from the University of Essex; George Pagoulatos and Spyros Blavoukos from Athens University; Madeleine Hosli, Paul Pennings, and Christine Arnold from the University of Leiden; Christophe Crombez and Jan Lebbe from Leuven University; Simon Hug and Tobias Schulz from the University of St. Gallen; and Stephanie Heisele from the German University of Administrative Sciences. The DOSEI project has been nominated for the 2006 European Union Descartes Prize for excellence in scientific collaborative research.

Sven-Oliver Proksch would like to gratefully acknowledge support for this research, conducted during his PhD study at the University of California-Los Angeles, from the UCLA Graduate Division, the UCLA Department of Political Science, the UCLA Center for European and Eurasian Studies, the Mannheimer Zentrum für Europäische Sozialforschung at the University of Mannheim, and the German National Academic Foundation

-xv-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reforming the European Union: Realizing the Impossible
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 227

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.