The Emancipation of Europe's Muslims: The State's Role in Minority Integration

By Jonathan Laurence | Go to book overview

Notes

PREFACE

1. Weinryb, Jewish Emancipation Under Attack, 1942, 5.


CHAPTER 1. A LEAP IN THE DARK: MUSLIMS AND
THE STATE IN TWENTY-FIRST-CENTURY EUROPE

1. On the verge of an earlier age of state formation, prior to the Second Reform Act that extended suffrage to part of the working classes, British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli was said to have discerned the “Conservative working man as the sculptor perceives the angel prisoned in a block of marble,” The Times (London), 1883. His contemporary Lord Derby wrote, “No doubt we are making a great experiment and taking ‘a leap in the dark’ but I have the greatest confidence in the sound sense of my fellow-countrymen, and I entertain a strong hope that the extended franchise which we are now conferring upon them will be the means of placing the institutions of this country on a firmer basis, and that the passing of this measure will tend to increase the loyalty and contentment of a great proportion of Her Majesty’s subjects,” 1867. Source for demographic projection: Pew Forum, “The Future of the Global Muslim Population,” 2011.

2. Wendehorst, “Emancipation as Path to National Integration,” 1999, 19294.

3. The precise ratios of emigrants in Europe versus total nationals abroad are difficult to obtain but approximately as follows: Turkey: 4 million / 5.5 million; Algeria: 4 million / 5 million; Morocco: 2.7 million / 3.4 million; Pakistan: 1.75 million / 4 million.

4. Pollack, “Wahrnehmung und Akzeptanz religiöser Vielfalt,” Münster: Religion und Politik, 2010; European Union Minorities and Discrimination Survey, “Data in Focus Report: Muslims,” EU Agency for Fundamental Rights, 2009.

5. Cf. The political philosopher Patchen Markell’s (2003) concept of a “double bind” and the political economist Karl Polanyi’s (1944) description of the simultaneous emergence of market economies and the expansion of social protections from the market.

6. Liedtke and Wendehorst, The Emancipation of Catholics, Jews and Protestants, 1999; Markell, Bound by Recognition, 2003.

7. Judah Leib Gordon (1862) in Stanislavski, For Whom do I Toil? Judah Leib Gordon and the Critique of Russian Jewry, 1988.

8. Cf. Shadid and Koningsveld, The Integration of Islam and Hinduism in Western Europe, 1991, pp. 8–9.

9. Allievi, Conflict over Mosques in Europe, 2009, p. 23.

-273-

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The Emancipation of Europe's Muslims: The State's Role in Minority Integration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Princeton Studies in Muslim Politics ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Tables xi
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Preface xvii
  • Chapter One - A Leap in the Dark 1
  • Chapter Two - European Outsourcing and Embassy Islam 30
  • Chapter Three - A Politicized Minority 70
  • Chapter Four - Citizens, Groups, and the State 105
  • Chapter Five - The Domestication of State-Mosque Relations 133
  • Chapter Six - Imperfect Institutionalization 163
  • Chapter Seven - The Partial Emancipation 198
  • Chapter Eight - Muslim Integration and European Islam in the Next Generation 245
  • Notes 273
  • Interviews 309
  • Bibliography 317
  • Index 355
  • Princeton Studies in Muslim Politics 367
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