The International Human Rights Movement: A History

By Aryeh Neier | Go to book overview

Index
AAAS. See American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
abolition movement (United States): advocates of, 35–36; after abolition, 39–40; and “Declaration of Sentiments,” 37; generally, 10; gradual abolition, 337n16; and Seneca Falls, New York convention, 37–38, 337n18; women involved in, 36–37
Abrams, Elliott, 172–73, 297
Abu Ghraib Prison, 133, 291, 298
accountability, 19, 258–84; and Argentina, 259–61, 264; and Democratic Republic of the Congo, 271, 273–74, 277, 284; and deniability 261; and Guatemala, 263–64;and International Criminal Court (ICC), 269–79; and International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY), 266–69, 282; and Kenya, 277–78; and Lebanon, 277–78; and Peru, 263; and Serbia, 281–83; and South Africa, 261–63; and Sudan (Darfur), 317; and “truth commissions,” 258, 260; and Yugoslavia, 264–65
ACLU. See American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU)
Addams, Jane, 46, 50
Addington, David, 295, 298, 304–5
Afghanistan: Soviet Union invasion of, 213–14; United States invasion of, 132–33
Africa, Human Rights Watch, 216
African Americans: voting, exclusion from, 45
African Union, 65, 109, 275
Agee, Philip, 248, 346n6
Ahmadinejad, President Mahmoud, 321
Ahtisaari, Martti, 277
AIDS. See HIV/AIDS
Alaei brothers, 238–39
Al Asmiya Palace, 291
Albright, Madeleine, 313
Alexeyeva, Ludmilla, 139, 144–45, 251–52
Alfonsín, Raúl, 171, 226, 259–61
Al-Haq, 248
Alito, Samuel, Jr., 296, 309
Allende, Salvador, 162–63
al-Qaeda, 133, 286, 354n12
Amanpour, Christiane, 239
American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), 238
American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU): director of, 205; establishment of, 10, 250; and international law, 104; membership recruitment of, 41; monitoring abuses of, 350n29; and postSeptember 11 detainees, 291, 293–94, 305; and role of courts, 46–47
American Fund for Free Jurists, 346n6
American Law Institute, 61
American League for India’s Freedom, 50
American National Red Cross, 120
American Women Suffrage Association, 38
Americas Watch, 207, 209–12; in Brazil, 227; in Cuba, 215; in El Salvador, 174; focus of, 214; in Jamaica, 227
Amis des Noirs (France), 34
Amnesty International, 186–203; attention to, 102; “brand,” study of, 201; on capital punishment, 196; claims against, 12; and Communism, 138; establishment of, 8–10; Europe, development in, 161, 198–99;

-359-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The International Human Rights Movement: A History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • 1 - The Movement 1
  • 2 - Putting Natural Law Principles into Practice 26
  • 3 - What Are Rights? 57
  • 4 - International Human Rights Law 93
  • 5 - International Humanitarian Law 117
  • 6 - Defying Communism 138
  • 7 - Rights on the Other Side of the Cold War Divide 161
  • 8 - Amnesty International 186
  • 9 - Human Rights Watch 204
  • 10 - The Worldwide Movement 233
  • 11 - Accountability 258
  • 12 - Rights after 9/11 285
  • 13 - Going Forward 318
  • Notes 335
  • Index 359
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 381

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.