The Rise and Fall of Meter: Poetry and English National Culture, 1860-1930

By Meredith Martin | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book is the result of years of conversation, consultation, and collaboration with many friends and scholars. The first and foremost among these is my brother, Robert Martin, whose intellectual investment, editorial acumen, and unconditional love is woven into every word of this project. This book would not have been possible without him, for so many reasons.

The support, kindness, and perspective of Zahid Chaudhary has been both constant and invaluable; I am so thankful to have him as a friend and colleague.

I have been privileged to think about historical poetics with a dream group of scholars over the past five years: Max Cavitch, Michael Cohen, Virginia Jackson, Meredith McGill, Yopie Prins, Eliza Richards, Jason Rudy, and Carolyn Williams. I am in awe of each of you and thank you for your contributions to this project. Many of the arguments and ideas I make here were first rehearsed in our meetings. This book is for all of us.

Yopie Prins deserves special recognition for nurturing this project in its nascent stages, for encouraging my research and writing, for teaching and training me, and for being my constant champion. She has been beside me every step of the way.

I am grateful for the support (over the years and across the globe) of my many dear friends, colleagues, teachers, and students: Gayle Salamon, Jess Roberts, Bonnie Smith, Martin Harries, Tricia McElroy, James McNaughton, Anne Reader, Eric Geile, Martha Carlson Mazur, Amy Young, Graham Smith, Miriam Allersma, Dana Linnane, Lani Kawamoto, Kathleen Brodhag, Janine Konkel, Mary Thiel, Trish York, Mary-Ellen Hoffman-Dono, Tina Fink, Vlad Preoteasa, Vicki Chen, Alex Lester, Matt Hopkins, Margot Wylie, Steve Heard, Peter Miller, Liz Alfred, Allen Grimm, Justin Read, Ania WoloszynskaRead, Ben Conisbee-Baer, Siona Wilson, Eve Sorum, Vivica Williams, Susan and Scott Hyman-Blumenthal, Forrest Perry, Laura Shingleton, Stewart Coleman, Rob Karl, Beth Rabbitt, Evan Johnston, Laura Halperin, Indra Mukhopadhahy, Charles Sabatos, Sylwia Ejmont, Michael Dickman, Peggy Carr, Stan Barrett, Kristen Syrett, Sean Cotter, Meg Cotter-Lynch, Cathy Crane, Alia Ayub, Gary Lloyd, Ben Crick, Jonathan Butt, Bryony Hall, James Hammersly, Lena Hull, Bill Howe, A. B. Huber, Mike Laffan, Charles LaPorte, Jason Hall, Kirstie Blair, Catherine Robson, Anne Jamison, Jim Richardson, John Whittier-Ferguson, Marjorie Levinson, Paulann Petersen, Ken Pallack, Ward Lewis, Karl Kirchwey, Mia Fineman, Joel Smith, Devin Fore, Simon

-ix-

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The Rise and Fall of Meter: Poetry and English National Culture, 1860-1930
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction- The Failure of Meter 1
  • 1 - The History of Meter 16
  • 2 - The Stigma of Meter 48
  • 3 - The Institution of Meter 79
  • 4 - The Discipline of Meter 109
  • 5 - The Trauma of Meter 145
  • 6 - The before- And Afterlife of Meter 181
  • Notes 207
  • Works Cited 241
  • Index 261
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