The Second Red Scare and the Unmaking of the New Deal Left

By Landon R. Y Storrson | Go to book overview

APPENDIX 2
Case Summaries

From several hundred loyalty cases, I selected these forty-two for their significance and for the completeness or richness of sources. Many of these cases are referred to in passing throughout the text. These cryptic summaries do not enumerate allegations and refutations, because doing so properly would require many pages for each case.


EXPLANATORY NOTES

LRB: Civil Service Commission Loyalty Review Board (reviewed decisions of lower loyalty boards, 1947–53).

“Flagged”: An employee who resigned before the LRB completed its postaudit of the employing agency’s decision was flagged, which meant a full reinvestigation would be required if that person tried to return to government service.

RIF: Reduction-in-force dismissal (theoretically without prejudice to employee).

IOELB: International Organizations Employee Loyalty Board, created 1953; because it technically did not have power to dismiss or retain, its decisions are listed as unfavorable/favorable.

Employment outside government is not listed, and generally only the highest or latest position held at an agency is listed.

Spouse/partner name is in boldface if there were allegations about him/her. For archival abbreviations, see the list at the beginning of the endnotes.


BERNSTEIN, BERNICE LOTWIN (1908–1996)

Attorney; New York regional dir. HEW, retained 1955

BA philosophy 1930, LLB 1933, University of Wisconsin. NRA 1934; SSB 1935–42, asst. gen. counsel; War Manpower Commission 1942–45, asst. gen. counsel; Dept. of Labor 1946; FSA/HEW 1947–77, Region 2 dir. 1966–77. Married Bernard Bernstein (asst. gen. counsel, Treasury Dept.) 1938; three daughters born 1940, 1943, 1946. Jewish.

Investigation (incomplete data): Aug. 1954 FBI full field investigation; Oct. 1954 suspended from HEW; cleared Feb. 1955. See her FBI file and see Bernard Bernstein Papers, HSTL.

-268-

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