Why Cats Land on Their Feet: And 76 Other Physical Paradoxes and Puzzles

By Mark Levi | Go to book overview

INDEX
angular momentum, 175
angular velocity, 178
anticyclone, 78, 80, 81
Bernoulli's law, 39, 40, 44, 73
bike, 64–70, 104, 108, 123
bike pump, 121, 122
bike tire, 125
bike wheel, 104, 107–109
boat: cavitation at the propeller, 149; in a rolling tub, 28–31; sailing, 132–135; on a sloped surface, 23, 24; in viscous water, 151–156
cat, 142–144, 147, 172, 176
center of mass: in a boat paradox, 152, 153; in biking, 67; definition of,169, 170; explanation of parabolic shape via, 22; in gymnastics, 60–63; and linear momentum, 173; and Newton's second law, 172; in the paradox with scales, 34, 35; in rotating chains, 100; in slithering ropes, 102; in space, 6, 8; in the tub paradoxes, 29–31
centrifugal force: and accelerating without pedaling, 67; alternative derivation of formula for, 183, 184; and the constant G-force roller coaster, 157; definition of, 181; and drifting icebergs, 26, 27; and the floating cork puzzle, 19; and fuel efficiency, 84, 85; and the gyroscopic force, 105, 106; and navigating in the presence of spin, 24, 25; and the parabolic shape of spinning fluid surface, 22; and a puzzle of bent pipe, 98; and rocking on swings, 57; and space navigation, 10; and a sprinkler puzzle, 48; and stabilization of inverted pendulum, 90; and turning on a bike, 64
centripetal acceleration: and centripetal force, 181; definition and formula for: 178, 179, 180; of an orbiting satellite, 15; of a rock in a sling, 95
centripetal force, 68, 69, 181
coffee rocket, 72, 73
comet, 13, 14, 167–169
conservation of energy: and Bernoulli's law, 40; and the gyroscopic reaction, 107; and a paradox with rockets, 71; versus perpetual motion, 127; statement and proof of, 168, 169
Coriolis force, 77; in a Boeing 747, 79; derivation of, 183–184; in the drain, 80; paradox with, 86; and the weather, 81–83

-189-

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Why Cats Land on Their Feet: And 76 Other Physical Paradoxes and Puzzles
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - Fun with Physical Paradoxes, Puzzles, and Problems 1
  • 2 - Outer Space Paradoxes 5
  • 3 - Paradoxes with Spinning Water 17
  • 4 - Floating and Diving Paradoxes 28
  • 5 - Flows and Jets 39
  • 6 - Moving Experiences- Bikes, Gymnastics, Rockets 57
  • 7 - Paradoxes with the Coriolis Force 77
  • 8 - Centrifugal Paradoxes 84
  • 9 - Gyroscopic Paradoxes 104
  • 10 - Some Hot Stuff and Cool Things 117
  • 11 - Two Perpetual Motion Machines 127
  • 12 - Sailing and Gliding 132
  • 13 - The Flipping Cat and the Spinning Earth 142
  • 14 - Miscellaneous 146
  • Appendix 161
  • Bibliography 187
  • Index 189
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