The Disaster Recovery Handbook: A Step-by-Step Plan to Ensure Business Continuity and Protect Vital Operations, Facilities, and Assets

By Michael Wallace; Lawrence Webber | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
BUILD AN INTERIM PLAN
Don’t Just Sit There, Do Something

Build it and they will come.
— Field of Dreams


INTRODUCTION
Building an effective business continuity plan can take a great deal of time and resources. By this point, you have identified the processes critical to your business in the Business Impact Analysis (Chapter 2), identified the risks to these processes in your risk assessment (Chapter 3), and determined your strategy for building a comprehensive plan (Chapter 4). Until the primary disaster plan begins coming together (Chapters 14 to 20), there are 11 steps you can take right now to provide some initial protection. The steps you follow in this chapter will be expanded in great detail in later chapters. Even if your disaster planning stops after this chapter, you will be noticeably better prepared.Create an Interim Plan Notebook to organize your information. It should contain:
1. Access to People. Organization charts should be included to show who is assigned what areas of responsibilities and who their assistants are. Contact information for each key person—work phone, home phone, cell phone number, pager number, and home address—should be included.
2. Access to the Facility. A set of keys must be available to every door, cabinet, and closet that holds equipment you support, all maintained in a secure key locker. This includes copies of any special system passwords.
3. Service Contracts. Be sure you have the name, address, telephone number (day and night), contact name (day and night), serial numbers of equipment

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